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Advisory Council

Thomas E. Lovejoy
Thomas E. Lovejoy

Thomas Lovejoy is an innovative and accomplished conservation biologist who coined the term “biological diversity”. In 2010 he was elected University Professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at George Mason University. He currently also holds the Biodiversity Chair at the Heinz Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment based in Washington, DC.  He served as President of the Heinz Center from 2002-2008.  Before assuming this position, Lovejoy was the World Bank’s Chief Biodiversity Advisor and Lead Specialist for Environment for Latin America and the Caribbean as well as Senior Advisor to the President of the United Nations Foundation. Spanning the political spectrum, Lovejoy has served on science and environmental councils under the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administrations.  At the core of these many influential positions are Lovejoy’s seminal ideas, which have formed and strengthened the field of conservation biology.  In the 1980s, he brought international attention to the world’s tropical rainforests, and in particular, the Brazilian Amazon, where he has worked since 1965. In 1980 he produced the first projection of global extinctions for the Global 2000 Report to the President. Lovejoy also developed the now ubiquitous “debt-for-nature” swap programs and led the Minimum Critical Size of Ecosystems project. With two co-edited books (1992 and 2005), he is credited with founding the field of climate change biology. He and Lee Hannah are working on the Second Edition of Climate Change and Biodiversity. He also founded the series Nature, the popular long-term series on public television.  In 2001, Lovejoy was awarded the prestigious Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement.  In 2009 he was the winner of BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Ecology and Conservation Biology Category. In 2009 he was appointed Conservation Fellow by the National Geographic. In 2012 he was recognized by the Blue Planet Prize. Lovejoy holds B.S. and Ph.D (biology) degrees from Yale University.



David T. Suzuki
David T. Suzuki

David T. Suzuki, Chair of the David Suzuki Foundation, is an award-winning scientist, environmentalist and broadcaster. David has received consistently high acclaim for his thirty years of award-winning work in broadcasting, explaining the complexities of science in a compelling, easily understood way. He is well known to millions as the host of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's popular science television series, The Nature of Things.

David has authored more than 40 books, and has received numerous awards for his work including a UNESCO prize for science, a United Nations Environment Program medal and the Order of Canada. He has 15 honorary doctorates from universities in Canada, the U.S. and Australia. For his work in support of Canada's First Nations people, David has received many tributes and has been honoured with five names and formal adoption by two tribes.



Stephen Groff
Stephen Groff

Stephen Groff is the Asian Development Bank’s Vice President for East Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific. Prior he was Deputy Director of the OECD’s Development Co-operation Directorate, which focuses on data and evidence-based policy advice that can build development cooperation between countries, agencies and donors. He was responsible for strategic policy analysis on a wide range of development-related economic and political issues. He also played a central role in the monitoring and evaluation of aid efforts, and served as acting director of the “Partnership for Democratic Governance” – a new multilateral initiative focused on fragile states.

Prior to joining OECD, Mr. Groff was Deputy Vice President for Operations at the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) – a new U.S. bilateral assistance initiative. Mr. Groff oversaw a broad range of MCC activities, including proposal development, proposal due diligence, compact negotiation and compact implementation. He was also responsible for advising the CEO on development issues, strategy and policy and played a central role in ensuring quality, technical excellence and development impact in MCC operations. Mr. Groff holds a two-year MPA from the Kennedy School at Harvard University and a B.S. from Yale College.



E.O. Wilson
E.O. Wilson

Edward O. Wilson is one of the world’s most distinguished scientists. Through his books and lectures, Wilson has changed the way scientists and nonscientists alike view the natural world by fueling their enthusiasm for science and showing them its immediacy for their everyday lives. Wilson’s devotion to natural history, his broad humanistic approach to learning, and a gift for storytelling make him one of the most popular teachers at Harvard. He has received over 100 awards in science and literature, including the National Medal of Science and the Pulitzer Prize.



James Gustave Speth
James Gustave Speth

James Gustave (“Gus”) Speth is a professor at Vermont Law School and a Distinguished Senior Fellow at Demos, a nonpartisan public policy research and advocacy organization. He is a former Dean of the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University and holds law degrees from Yale University and Oxford University. From 1993 to 1999, Dean Speth served as administrator of the United Nations Development Programme and chair of the UN Development Group. Prior to his service at the UN, he was Founder and President of the World Resources Institute; Professor of Law at Georgetown University; Chairman of the U.S. Council on Environmental Quality; and Senior Attorney and Co-founder of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Among his awards are the National Wildlife Federation’s Resources Defense Award, the Natural Resources Council of America’s Barbara Swain Award of Honor, a 1997 Special Recognition Award from the Society for International Development, the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Environmental Law Institute, and the Blue Planet Prize. He was also named Lee Kuan Yew Distinguished Fellow in 2005 (Singapore).

Publications include Red Sky at Morning: America and the Crisis of the Global Environment; Worlds Apart: Globalization and the Environment; and articles in Foreign Policy, Foreign Affairs, Environmental Science and Technology, the Columbia Journal World of Business, and other journals and books.

 



Daniel Pauly
Daniel Pauly

Dr. Daniel Pauly is Professor and Director of the Fisheries Centre at the University of British Columbia, Canada. He received his masters (1974), doctorate (1979) and ‘habilitation’ (1985) in Fisheries Biology and Biological Oceanography from the University of Kiel, Germany. Dr Pauly initiated the launching of FishBase, the global database on fish, and the further development of the ‘Ecopath’ modeling software, two products now setting global standards in their respective areas. At UBC, the bulk of his research is conducted through the Sea Around Us Project, of which he is the Principal Investigator, and which is devoted to studying the impact of fisheries on the world’s marine ecosystems.



Oscar Arias
Oscar Arias

Former President of Costa Rica and 1987 Nobel Peace Laureate, Oscar Arias holds international stature as a spokesperson for the developing world. Championing such issues as human development, democracy and demilitarization, he has traveled the globe spreading a message of peace and applying the lessons garnered from the Central American Peace Process to topics of current global debate. In 1987, President Arias drafted a peace plan to end the regional crisis in Central America. Widely recognized as the Arias Peace Plan, his initiative culminated in the signing of the Esquipulas II Accords or the Procedure to Establish a Firm and Lasting Peace in Central America by all the Central American presidents on August 7, 1987. In that same year he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.



Julia Marton-Lefèvre
Julia Marton-Lefèvre

Julia Marton-Lefèvre became Director General of IUCN in 2007. Previously she was Rector of the University for Peace, a UN Treaty Organization with its main campus in San José, Costa Rica. She is also Vice Chair of the World Resources Institute and a member of a number of boards and commissions, including: the Board of Directors of the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) and LEAD International, and the Board of Trustees of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina. She serves on environmental advisory bodies to the Dow Chemical Company and The Coca-Cola Company.

Before her position at the University for Peace, she was Executive Director of LEAD (Leadership for Environment and Development) International, whose headquarters were in New York, then in London. Before LEAD, she was Executive Director of the International Council for Science (ICSU), based in Paris. Prior positions have included Programme Specialist in Environmental Education under a joint UNESCO-UNEP Programme; university teacher in Thailand as a Peace Corps Volunteer, and a staff member of the Fund for Education and Peace in New York.

Ms. Marton-Lefèvre has co-authored numerous books and papers. In 1999 she received the AAAS Award for International Cooperation in Science. She is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society of the United Kingdom. She studied history, ecology and environmental planning in the U.S. and in France and was born in Hungary.



William Rees
William Rees

William Rees received his Ph.D. in population ecology from the University of Toronto and has taught at and directed the University of British Columbia’s School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP) since 1969. Professor Rees’ teaching and research focuses on the public policy and planning implications of global environmental trends and the necessary ecological conditions for sustainable socioeconomic development. Professor Rees is best known for co-inventing the Ecological Footprint concept with then Ph.D. student Dr. Mathis Wackernagel. Professor Rees is a founding member and recent former-President of the Canadian Society for Ecological Economics. He is also a co-investigator in the Global Integrity Project, aimed at defining the ecological and political requirements for biodiversity preservation. In 2000, The Vancouver Sun newspaper recognized him as one of British Columbia’s top “public intellectuals.”



Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker
Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker

Ernst von Weizsäcker is co-president of the Club of Rome and co-chair of the UNEP Resource Council. He is the former Dean of the Donald Bren School for Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara. A former member of the German Bundestag (1998-2006), Dr. von Weizsäcker was also Chairman of Environment Committee of the German Bundestag. Formerly Professor of Biology and President of the University of Kassel, Dr. von Weizsäcker has served as Director of the United Nations Centre on Science and Technology, the Institute for European Environmental Policy and, from 1991-2000, President of the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. He has been a member of the Club of Rome since 1992. His book, Factor Four: Doubling Wealth, Halving Resource Use, has been translated into 12 languages.



Lester Brown
Lester Brown

Lester Brown founded the Worldwatch Institute, the first research institute devoted to the analysis of global environmental issues. Brown has authored or coauthored 49 books. In May 2001, he founded the Earth Policy Institute to provide a vision and a road map for achieving an environmentally sustainable economy. He is the recipient of many prizes and awards, including more than 20 honorary degrees, a MacArthur Fellowship, the 1987 United Nations’ Environment Prize, the 1989 World Wide Fund for Nature Gold Medal, and the 1994 Blue Planet Prize for his “exceptional contributions to solving global environmental problems.”



M. S. Swaminathan
M. S. Swaminathan

Prof. M S Swaminathan has been acclaimed by TIME magazine as one of the 20 most influential Asians of the 20th century and one of the only three from India, the other two being Mahatma Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore. He has been described by the United Nations Environment Programme as “the Father of Economic Ecology” and by Javier Perez de Cuellar, Secretary General of the United Nations, as “a living legend who will go into the annals of history as a world scientist of rare distinction.”

He has served as President of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. Prof. Swaminathan is a Fellow of many of the leading scientific academies of India and the world, including the Royal Society of London and the US National Academy of Sciences. He has received 43 honorary doctorate degrees from universities around the world. He currently holds the UNESCO Chair in Ecotechnology at the M S Swaminathan Research Foundation in Chennai (Madras), India.



Manfred Max-Neef
Manfred Max-Neef

Manfred Max-Neef is a Chilean economist who has gained an international reputation for his work and writing on development alternatives. In addition to a long academic career, Max-Neef achieved an impressive minority vote when he stood as candidate in the Chilean Presidential election of 1993. He was subsequently appointed Rector of the Universidad Austral de Chile in Valdivia. In 1981 he wrote the book for which he is best known, From the Outside Looking In: Experiences in Barefoot Economics. It describes his experiences as an economist attempting to practice ‘economics as if people matter’ among the poor in South America. In the same year he set up in Chile the organization CEPAUR (Centre for Development Alternatives), dedicated to the reorientation of development in terms of stimulating local self-reliance and satisfying fundamental human needs. He has worked on development projects in Latin America for the Pan-American Union, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization and the International Labour Office.

In 1983, he received the Right Livelihood Award and his other awards include the National Prize for the Promotion and Defense of Human Rights, Chile, and the Kenneth Boulding Award from the International Society for Ecological Economics.



Herman E. Daly
Herman E. Daly

Herman E. Daly is currently a Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Affairs. From 1988 to 1994 he was Senior Economist in the Environment Department of the World Bank. He holds a B.A. from Rice University and a Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University. He has served on the boards of directors of numerous environmental organizations, and is Co-founder and Associate Editor of the journal Ecological Economics. His interest in economic development, population, resources and environment has resulted in over a hundred articles in professional journals and anthologies, as well as numerous books, including Toward a Steady-State Economy (1973); Steady-State Economics (1977; 1991); Valuing the Earth (1993); Beyond Growth (1996); and Ecological Economics and the Ecology of Economics (1999). He is co-author with theologian John B. Cobb, Jr. of For the Common Good (1989; 1994) which received the 1991 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas for Improving World Order. In 1996 he received Sweden’s Honorary Right Livelihood Award and the Heineken Prize for Environmental Science, awarded by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.



Rhodri Morgan
Rhodri Morgan

Rhodri Morgan is the former First Minister and Leader of Labour in the Welsh National Assembly and was the Assembly Member for the Cardiff West constituency from 1999 to 2011. He was appointed to the Privy Council in July 2000.

Rhodri Morgan was born in Cardiff in 1939, and educated at Oxford and Harvard. He was the head of the European Commission Office in Wales from 1980 to 1987. He represented Cardiff West at Westminster from 1987 to 2001 and was a front-bench spokesperson on Energy (1988-1992) and Welsh Affairs (1992-1997). He chaired the House of Commons Select Committee on Public Administration from 1997 to 1999. He is a Welsh speaker.



Emil Salim
Emil Salim

Emil Salim is on the faculty of economics at the University of Indonesia. Previously, he was the State Minister for Population and Environment (1978-1993). He currently serves as a member of many international and national committees including the United Nations High Level Advisory Board on Sustainable Development. He serves as Chairman of National Economic Board, an economic expert team to President Abdurachman Wahid. He was the economic expert to President Suharto on debt and development issues of the nonaligned countries and the Indonesian Peoples’ Assembly. He was Co-chairman of the World Commission on Forestry and Sustainable Development.

Dr. Salim also serves as Chairman of the Board of Trustees for a number of leading Indonesian environmental organizations including the Indonesian Biodiversity Foundation, the Foundation for Sustainable Development and the Indonesian Ecolabelling Institute. He received his master’s degree and his doctorate in economics from the University of California at Berkeley in the United States.



Norman Myers
Norman Myers

Norman Myers is a Professor and Visiting Fellow at Green College, Oxford University and at the Said Business School. As an internationally renowned environmental scientist, he has been a visiting professor at the Universities of Kent, Utrecht, Tokyo, Cape Town, Harvard, Yale, Cornell, Duke, Michigan, Texas, Stanford, and California. Myers has been a senior advisor to the United Nations, the World Bank, the OECD, the White House, scientific academies in a dozen countries, CEOs, prime ministers and presidents. His expertise is systems ecology, disruption of future evolution, resource economics, population, poverty and biodiversity, with field experience in more than 50 countries, hundreds of scholarly papers and 19 books.  Myers is best known for establishing the biodiversity “hotspots” strategy for conservation planning in the late 1980s. Dr. Myers is one of only two people worldwide to receive all three leading environmental prizes: Volvo Environment Prize, UNEP/Sasakawa Environment Prize, and Blue Planet Prize. In 1997, he was appointed by Queen Elizabeth to The Order of St. Michael and St. George “For Services to The Global Environment.”



Fabio Feldmann
Fabio Feldmann

In October 2000, Fabio Feldmann was appointed the Executive Secretary of the Brazilian Climate Forum, and Special Advisor to the President for the WSSD meeting preparatory process in Brazil. In 1994 he was appointed State Secretary for the Environment of Sao Paulo, leaving office in 1998, after an outstanding record in implementing environmental policies in the state. He was elected for Congress as the first environmental representative in 1986, and was re-elected for three consecutive mandates. As a leader in Congress he coordinated the group that wrote the chapter on the environment in the Constitution passed in 1988. Fabio Feldmann is a lawyer and a business administrator by training, and has been an environmental activist since the early seventies. In 1990, Mr. Feldmann was awarded UNEP’s Global 500 in acknowledgment of his contribution to the environmental cause.



Jorgen Randers
Jorgen Randers

Professor Jorgen Randers is an internationally known sustainability researcher. In 1973, Jorgen earned a Ph.D. in Management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is one of the authors of the groundbreaking work Limits to Growth, which helped catalyze global awareness that humanity is confronting ecological limits. Professor Randers served as Deputy Director General for WWF-World Wide Fund for Nature (1994-1999). He served as full-time Chairman of the Board of five companies (1992-1993), and has more recently been on the Board of several corporations. Currently, Professor Randers is Chair of the Center for Corporate Citizenship and President Emeritus of the Norwegian School of Management.



Dominique Voynet
Dominique Voynet

Dominique Voynet, trained as a medical doctor, has been an environmental activist since the 1970s. In 1989, she was a European deputy. From 1992 to 1994 she was a member of the conseil régional (regional council) of Franche-Comté. From 1997 to 2001, she was the French Minister of the Environment and Regional Planning in Lionel Jospin’s government. In 2004, she was elected senator for the Seine-Saint-Denis département. Dominique Voynet was France’s Green candidate for the 2007 presidential election.



Michael Meacher
Michael Meacher

The Rt. Hon. Michael Meacher MP is the former U.K. Minister of State (Environment and Agri-Environment, 2001-2003). He was Minister for the Environment at the former Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions from 1997 to 2001. He was appointed a member of the Privy Council in 1997. He has been the Member of Parliament for Oldham West and Royton since 1970. He was formerly chief opposition spokesman on environmental protection (from 1996). Before that, he was chief opposition spokesman on employment, transport, Citizen’s Charter, development and co-operation, social security, and health. From 1974-1975 he was Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department of Industry and at the Department of Trade between 1976-1979. He was also Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department of Health and Social Security between 1975-1976.



Karl-Henrik Robèrt
Karl-Henrik Robèrt

Karl-Henrik Robèrt, M.D., Ph.D., is one of Sweden’s foremost cancer scientists who, in 1989, initiated an environmental organization called The Natural Step. Dr. Robèrt received his M.D. in 1975, his Ph.D. in 1979 and in 1982 he became a Professor of Internal Medicine. He has lectured at international conferences and while heading a research laboratory at the Karolinska Institute, the leading cancer Research Institute in Sweden, Dr. Robèrt authored numerous scientific publications concerning leukemia, lymphoma, lung cancer and their clinical implications. He has written many books and articles on the environment and sustainability that encourage an understanding of the linkage between ecology and economy. With Dr. John Holmberg, he developed the “system conditions” for ecological sustainability. Dr. Robèrt mobilized 20 independent professional networks to initiate and support the framework of The Natural Step, while producing educational materials and distributing them to every household and school in Sweden. Major Swedish companies, business corporations, as well as municipalities, including Stockholm, have begun to incorporate the system conditions into their business practices.



Will Steffen
Will Steffen

Will Steffen is the Director of Australian National University’s Climate Change Institute after being the inaugural director of the ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society. From 2004 to 2011 he served as science adviser to the Australian Government Department of Climate Change. He is currently a Climate Commissioner with the Australian Government Climate Commission; Chair of the Antarctic Science Advisory Committee, Co-Director of the Canberra Urban and Regional Futures (CURF) initiative and Member of the ACT Climate Change Council. Before relocating back in Australia, he was the Executive Director of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP).



Peter Raven
Peter Raven

Peter H. Raven is Director emeritus of the Missouri Botanical Garden and one of the world’s leading botanists and advocates of conservation and biodiversity. In addition, Dr. Raven is past President and Chairman of the Board of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also Chairman of the National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration, and Chair of the Division of Earth and Life Studies of the National Research Council, which includes biology, chemistry and geology.

Dr. Raven has received the Volvo Environment Prize, the U.S. National Medal of Science, and he has held Guggenheim and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowships.



Eric Garcetti
Eric Garcetti

Eric Garcetti is the 42nd Mayor of Los Angeles and served as President of the Los Angeles City Council from 2006 to 2012. As a councilmember, Garcetti led the creation of a $100 million Affordable Housing Trust Fund, the establishment of the country’s largest environmentally sensitive Green Building Initiative, and the expansion of health care provision and living-wage jobs through a new Healthcare Career Ladder. Global Green and former President Mikhail Gorbachev awarded the councilmember with a Green Cross Millennium Award in recognition of his environmental work. Garcetti studied urban planning and political science at Columbia University, where he received his B.A. and M.A. in International Relations. He studied as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University and the London School of Economics.



Wangari Maathai
Wangari Maathai

The world has lost one of its greatest leaders.

Former Advisory Council Member Ms Wangari Maathai passed away on September 26, 2011. In 2003, she was among the first to accept being on Global Footprint Network’s Advisory Council.

Wangari Muta Maathai was the Founder of Africa's Green Belt Movement and the 2004 winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. She was internationally recognized for her persistent struggle for democracy, human rights and environmental conservation. Prof. Maathai served on the boards of several organizations including the UN Secretary Generals Advisory Board on Disarmament, The Jane Goodall Institute, Women and Environment Development Organization (WEDO), World Learning for International Development, Green Cross International, Environment Liaison Center International, the WorldWIDE Network of Women in Environmental Work and National Council of Women of Kenya.

“Wangari Maathai was a force of nature,” stated Achim Steiner, the executive director of the United Nation’s environmental program to the New York Times. He likened her to Africa’s ubiquitous acacia trees, “strong in character and able to survive sometimes the harshest of conditions.”